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Centre for Geopolitics

Providing historically-grounded solutions to enduring geopolitical problems
 
Hugo Bromley
Ax:son Johnson Research Assistant in Applied History
Ax:son Johnson Research Assistant in Applied History
Sophia RC Johnson photo
Convener, Reading group ‘Global political theologies’ (2020-2021)
Biography: 

Sophia R.C. Johnson is a PhD Candidate at the Faculty of Divinity, specialising in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible. Her PhD research traces the historical development of the conception of “covenant” in the biblical books of 1 & 2 Samuel to show how subsequent interpretation of the text was influenced by the ever-changing political landscape of the ancient Israelite community. She completed her MPhil in Cambridge on the ancient Near Eastern legal background of the oath between the biblical figures of David and Jonathan. She also studied ancient history and archeology at Jerusalem University College in Israel.

Sophia is especially interested in the relationship between ideas about covenant, state, and national identity in relation to the reception history of Old Testament narratives. She is guest-editor for the Journal of the Bible and its Reception towards a special issue “Old Testament Imaginaries of the Nation in German, Dutch, and Anglo-American Political Thought” (forthcoming 2021). She co-chairs the Miqra Society, the Hebrew Bible graduate research seminar, and acts as the Old Testament representative for the Divinity Faculty Anti-Racism Working Group.

Ax:son Johnson Research Assistant in Applied History
Biography: 

James is is a Research Assistant at the Centre for Geopolitics, and the holder of the JH Plumb Scholarship at Christ’s College. He is in the second year of his PhD in Politics and International Studies, and his research is into theorisations of popular sovereignty as a political fiction. 

Christopher Wadibia
Ax:son Johnson Research Assistant in Applied History
Biography: 

Christopher Wadibia is a third year PhD candidate in the Faculty of Divinity and Selwyn College studying the relationship between Pentecostalism and sustainable development in Nigeria. Before coming to Cambridge, Christopher completed a BA inGovernment at Georgetown University in 2016, won a Fulbright research grant with the United States Department of State to study Muslim-Christian relations in Nigeria in 2017, and completed an MPhil in Intercultural Theology and Interreligious Studies at Trinity College Dublin in 2018 where he won the James Haire Prize for Outstanding Coursework. Christopher's doctoral research seeks to explain how the themes of power politics and capacity-building inform the social development enterprises of the Redeemed Christian Church of God (RCCG), one of Nigeria's most sociopolitically influential indigenous Pentecostal churches. Alongside his appointment as an Ax:son Johnson Research Assistant in Applied History for the Centre for Geopolitics, Christopher also serves as an Honorary PhD Scholar at the Woolf Institute, assistant editor for the academic journal PentecoStudies, and as a convener for Cambridge University's Protestant Political Thought (PPT) reading group.